Awesome Astronomy Images of God’s Universe (APOD 1995 series + 1969 moon landing)

The Trifid Nebula –  Credit: Hopkins Observatory, Karen Gloria

Explanation: The vivid blue and violet colors present in the Trifid Nebula result from the abundance of young stars there. The light from young massive stars is quite blue and has the ability to remove electrons from surrounding gas. When these electrons re-combine with the gas, radiation rich in blue and violet light is emitted. Some of the nebula’s light also results from the reflection of star light off of extremely small carbon specks known as ‘dust’. This object is known to astronomers as M20 – the twentieth object on Charles Messier’s list of diffuse sky objects. This image was taken with a 6-inch refracting telescope. Many images of Messier objects can be found in The Electronic Universe Project’s The Galaxy Gallery: Messier Objects.

M31: The Andromeda Galaxy
Credit: The Electronic Universe Project

Explanation: Andromeda is the nearest major galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy. Our Galaxy is thought to look much like Andromeda. Together these two galaxies dominate the Local Group of galaxies. The diffuse light from Andromeda is caused by the hundreds of billions of stars that compose it. The several distinct stars that surround Andromeda’s image are actually stars in our Galaxy that are well in front of the background object. Andromeda is frequently referred to as M31 since it is the 31st object on Messier’s list of diffuse sky objects. M31 is so distant it takes about 2 million years for light to reach us from there.

Earth’s Moon, A Familiar Face
Credit: Clementine, BMDO, NRL, LLNL

Explanation: The  mosaic of the Earth’s Moon was compiled from photos taken by the spacecraft Clementine in 1994. This image represents the side of the Moon familiar to Earth dwellers. The Moon revolves around the Earth about once every 28 days. Since its rate of rotation about its axis is also once in 28 days, it always keeps the same face toward the Earth. As the Moon travels around its orbit, the Earth based view of the half of the Moon that faces the Sun changes causing the regular monthly progression of Lunar phases. Humans first crashed a spacecraft into the Moon in 1959, but the first humans to reach the Moon landed in 1969. There are now golf balls on the Moon.

The Far Side
Credit: The Soviet Lunar Program

Explanation: This historic picture was humanity’s first glimpse of the far side of the Moon. It was taken by the Soviet spacecraft Luna 3 in October of 1959. Luna 3 followed closely on the heels of another Soviet probe, Luna 2, which had become the first spacecraft to impact the Moon on September 13th of that same year.

Why does the Moon have a far side? Gravitational tidal forces within the Earth-Moon system have synchronized the Moon’s period of rotation around its axis with its orbital period at about 28 days. So, as the Moon moves around its orbit its rotation exactly compensates, keeping the same face toward the Earth.

Standing on the Moon
Credit: NASA, Kennedy Space Center, Neil Armstrong

Explanation: Pictured, the second person to walk on the Moon: Edwin „Buzz” Aldrin. During this Apollo 11 mission, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the Moon while Michael Collins circled in the Command Module above. The lunar team erected a plaque on the surface that reads: HERE MEN FROM THE PLANET EARTH, FIRST SET FOOT UPON THE MOON JULY 1969 A.D., WE CAME IN PEACE FOR ALL MANKIND. The Apollo missions demonstrated that it is possible to land humans on the Moon and return them safely.

One Small Step
Credit: NASA, Kennedy Space Center, Neil Armstrong

Explanation: On July 20th, 1969, a human first set foot on the Moon. Pictured above is the first lunar footprint. The footprint and distinction of the first person to walk on the Moon belong to Neil Armstrong. It has been estimated that one billion people world-wide watched Armstrong’s first step – making the live transmission from a camera mounted on the lunar lander the highest rated television show ever. Upon setting foot on the moon, Armstrong said: „That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind.” The Apollo missions to the Moon have been described as the result of the greatest technological mobilization the world has known.

The video of the very first moon landing of the apollo 11 mission in 1969! Neil Armstrong was the first man to set foot on the moon with his now legenday words „One small step for man, a giant leap for mankind.” This is a truly amazing video from 1969!!!

Videourile Vodpod nu mai sunt disponibile.

1st Moon Landing in 1969, posted with vodpod

 

 

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