Puritan Thomas Brooks – The secret of being content

Thomas Brooks (1608 – 1680)

Much of what is known about Thomas Brooks has been ascertained from his writings. Born, likely to well-to-do parents, in 1608, Brooks entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1625, where he was preceded by such men as Thomas Hooker, John Cotton, and Thomas Shepard. He was licensed as a preacher of the Gospel by 1640. Before that date, he appears to have spent a number of years at sea, probably as a chaplain with the fleet.

After the conclusion of the First English Civil War, Thomas Brooks became minister at Thomas Apostle’s, London, and was sufficiently renowned to be chosen as preacher before the House of Commons on December 26, 1648. His sermon was afterwards published under the title, ‘God’s Delight in the Progress of the Upright’, the text being Psalm 44:18: ‘Our heart is not turned back, neither have our steps declined from Thy way’. Three or four years afterwards, he transferred to St. Margaret’s, Fish-street Hill, London. In 1662, he fell victim to the notorious Act of Uniformity, but he appears to have remained in his parish and to have preached as opportunity arose. Treatises continued to flow from his pen.

The secret of being content

A man needs very little of this world’s goods to
carry him through his pilgrimage, until he comes
to his home—until he comes to heaven.

A little will satisfy the demands of nature;
though nothing will satisfy a man’s lusts!

„I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances
I am. I know both how to have a little, and I know how
to have a lot. In any and all circumstances I have learned
the secret of being content—whether well-fed or hungry,
whether in abundance or in need.” Philippians 4:11-12

A Christian, in the midst of all his worldly delights, comforts,
and entertainments, says, „Oh these are not the delights, the
comforts, the contentments which my soul looks for, which
my soul expects and hopes to enjoy. I look and hope . . .
for choicer delights,
for sweeter comforts,
for more satisfying contentments,
for more durable riches!

A Christian’s motto always is, or always should be, „I hope
for better things! I hope for better things than any the world
can give to me, or than any that Satan can take from me!”

„They admitted that they were aliens and strangers on
earth. Instead, they were longing for a better country
—a heavenly one.” Hebrews 11:13, 16

Source – Sermonindex.net

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