Bach and Beethoven for Easter – Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus–Beethoven Oratorio: Christ on the Mount of Olives–Hallelujah

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Oratorio, „Christ on the Mount of Olives”

Ludwig Van Beethoven
(1770-1827)

Beethoven wrote but one oratorio, „Christus am Oelberge” („Christ on the Mount of Olives”). It was begun in 1800 and finished during the following year. The text is by Huber, and was written, with Beethoven’s assistance, in fourteen days. The first performance of the work is entirely took place at Vienna, April 5, 1803, at the Theater an der Wien.

The closing number, a chorus of angels („Hallelujah, God’s almighty Son”), is introduced with a short but massive symphony leading to a jubilant burst of „Hallelujah,” which finally resolves itself into a glorious fugue. In all sacred music it is difficult to find a choral number which can surpass it in majesty or power.

Lyrics for the Hallelujah

Hallelujah unto God’s Almighty Son Praise the Lord, ye bright angelic choirs
In holy songs of Joy.
Man, proclaim his grace and glory,
Hallelujah unto God’s Almighty Son
Praise the Lord in holy songs of joy.

Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus-Beethoven Oratorio:

Christ on the Mount of Olives–Hallelujah (4 min)

VIDEO by danthonycal

Full Beethoven Oratorio

Christ on the Mount of Olives (52 min)

VIDEO by Ulrich Dünnebach

Christus am Ölberge, op 85, Oratorio
by Ludwig van Beethoven

St Matthew Passion – Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 

(Complete 3 hours) (Full Concert) (J. S. Bach)

St Matthew Passion – Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 | (Complete) (Full Concert) (J. S. Bach)
The St Matthew Passion, (also frequently St Matthew’s Passion) BWV 244, (German: Matthäus-Passion), is a sacred oratorio from the Passions written by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander (Christian Friedrich Henrici). It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew (in the German translation of Martin Luther) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini Nostri J.C. Secundum Evangelistam Matthaeum translates to „The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew.”

Although Bach wrote four (or five) settings of the Passions only two have survived; the other is the St John Passion. The St Matthew Passion was probably first performed on Good Friday (11 April) 1727[1] in the Thomaskirche in Leipzig, where Bach was the Kantor of the School and Directoris Chori musici of Leipzig. He revised it by 1736, performing it again on 30 March 1736, this time including two organs in the instrumentation. He further revised and performed it again on 24 March 1742. Possibly due to the second organ being under repair, he switched the continuo instrument to harpsichord in Coro II, reinforced the continuo group in Coro II with a viola da gamba, and inserted a ripieno soprano in both movements 1 and 29. There is evidence of a further revision in 1743–1746, when the score as we know it originated, but no performance.

VIDEO by ClassicalMusicTVHD

Bach – Passion according to the Gospel of John

Bach – Passion selon Saint Jean BWV 245 (2 hrs)

The St John Passion (German: Johannes-Passion), BWV 245, is a sacred oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach. The original Latin title Passio secundum Johannem translates to „The Suffering According to John”. During the first winter that Bach was responsible for church music at the St. Thomas Church and the St. Nicholas Church in Leipzig, he composed the St John Passion for the Good Friday Vespers service of 1724.

The St John Passion is a dramatic representation of the Passion as told in the Gospel of John, constructed of dramatically presented recitatives and choruses, with commentary in reflective chorales, ariosos, and arias, framed by opening and final choruses, leading to a final chorale.

VIDEO by MusicArt61

Bach – Passion according to the Gospel of Luke

Bach – Passion selon Saint Luc BWV 246(2 hrs)

VIDEO by MusicArt61

Bach – Passion according to the Gospel of Mark

Bach – Passion selon Saint Marc BWV 247 (2 hrs)

VIDEO by MusicArt61

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