Știri pro-life internaționale (ONU, Africa, Irlanda, Australia, Belgia) Un organism ONU denaturează (din nou) un tratat, pentru a promova avortul

United Nations FOTO Wikipedia

ONU: negarea accesului la serviciile de avort „poate duce la tortură sau tratament crud, inuman și degradant.”

Australia interzice protestele în fața clinicilor de avort

Belgia: Noua propunere legislativă pentru „Moarte la cerere”

Un organism ONU denaturează (din nou) un tratat, pentru a promova avortul

Un organ de monitorizare al ONU a făcut publică o declarație bazată pe o interpretare a unui tratat care pare să abandoneze cu totul sensul recunoscut la nivel internațional în schimbul unei interpretări arbitrare. De această dată, Comitetul privind drepturile economice, sociale și culturale („CESCR”) a publicat Comentariul General Nr. 22 (2016) asupra drepturilor sexuale și reproductive (articolul 12 din Pactul Internațional cu privire la Drepturile Economice, Sociale și Culturale), document ce promovează accesul la serviciile de avort și susține că negarea accesului la acestea „poate duce la tortură sau tratament crud, inuman și degradant.”

Comunicatul de presă al ONU referitor la Comentariu prevede:

„Dreptul de acces la servicii medicale pentru sănătatea sexuală și reproductivă nu numai că face parte din dreptul universal la servicii medicale, dar este și în directă legătură cu celelalte drepturi fundamental umane la care avem acces, inclusiv dreptul la educație, muncă și egalitate, precum și dreptul la viață, la intimitate, dreptul de a nu fi torturat și dreptul la autonomie,”’

au declarat experții ONU.

Citeste mai mult aici – http://www.culturavietii.ro/2016/07/15/stiri-pro-life-internationale/

Reclame

Stop Barnevernet Gambia, Africa – Tata si fiu au demonstrat in fata Consulatului Norvegian 16 Aprilie 2016

Carito and son protesting in Gambia Africa april 16th

Carito spune ca e ilegal sa protestezi in Gambia si a incercat sa protesteze cu mare grija impreuna cu fiul sau ca sa nu fie arestati. Si-au facut tricouri si banere cu care au protestat in fata Consulatului Norvegian.

Father and son protest in Gambia, Africa: Bring the Bodnariu kids home!

Africa and Gambia had a little protest oo, ttoday, 16. th of April!

Carito and dad, what’s best for the children!
We made our own t-shirts and a banner and came to the Norwegian / Swedish Embassy. Demonstrations are crazy illegal in Gambia so we had to keep it low-key, immediately after we got out of the car stopped people up to see smile emoticon

Now Norwegian authorities soon begin to not only stop, but also to correct the grove overtrampene they have done in hundreds of families around, both out in the world but also in the little „safe” Norway.

This war will rage till someone takes responsibility and madness ends, we’ll give us never!

Bring the kids home!

Simona Caba, misionara de 10 ani in Mozambique, interviu (30 min)

Simona Caba - misionari Africa pentru IsusSimona Caba, Misionar in Mozambic cu ‘Africa pentru Isus’ (org)

Am postat cu o luna in urma un clip de 10 min cu Simona Caba, iar astazi AlfaOmegaTV a postat un interviu de 22 min care include si acel clip si pe care il redam aici:

Nascuta intr-o familie mare din Oradea, si crescand in Biserica Betel, Simona a invatat sa-L iubeasca pe Isus si sa fie pasionata pentru lucrarea evanghelizarii. Parintii au invatat-o lucrarea de evanghelizare si misiune si Simona marturiseste ca dragostea ei pentru Dumnezeu a manat-o in sudul Africii, in Mozambic.

SImona Caba 2Trimisă de:
– Biserica Creştină Penticostală “Betel” din Oradea – Bihor
Organizația misionară prin care e plecată:
– Agenţia Penticostală de Misiune Externă;
Zona unde slujeşte:
– Mozambic
Implicarea pe câmpul de misiune:
– Implicare în educaţie creştină, în lucrarea cu copii şi adolescenţii, alfabetizare, organizarea de seminarii şi conferinţe

http://www.apme.ro

Din motive necunoscute AlfaOmegaTV a retras aceste 2 fisier: Partea 1-a si a 2-a. Daca ei le vor adauga din nou, le vom adauga si noi aici.

Part 1

(reincarcata din nou, dar de 28 min vs. 22 pe data de 3 feb 2014)

VIDEO by Alfa Omega TV

Simona Caba

Motto-ul personal: – „Evanghelia este o veste bună numai dacă ajunge la timp!

O alta varianta a interviului (Nu stim care versiune o va tine Alfa Omega TV si care o va retrage si deci, postam ambele versiuni ale interviului, notand ca au mai fost si partile 2 &3, care au fost retrase. Daca vor fi repostate, le vom adauga si noi din nou)

Part 1

VIDEO by Alfa Omega TV

Simona Caba, misionara de 10 ani in Mozambique

Simona Caba - misionari Africa pentru IsusSimona Caba, Misionar in Mozambic cu ‘Africa pentru Isus’ (org)

Nascuta intr-o familie mare din Oradea, si crescand in Biserica Betel, Simona a invatat sa-L iubeasca pe Isus si sa fie pasionata pentru lucrarea evanghelizarii. Parintii au invatat-o  lucrarea de evanghelizare si misiune si Simona marturiseste ca dragostea ei pentru Dumnezeu a manat-o in sudul Africii, in Mozambic.

VIDEO by Alfa Omega TV (10 min)

Open Doors USA 2013 world ranking of persecution by country – North Korea still #1, Mali newcomer to list #7

WWL-Main-Download

Information and watch list from the non denominational group http://www.OpenDoorsUSA.org. Rankings released January 8,2013

North Korea – For the eleventh year running, this is the most difficult place on earth to be a Christian. In a country of 24.5 million, there are just 400,000 Christians. North Korea is one of the remaining Communist states, and it is vehemently opposed to religion of any kind. Christians are classified as hostile and face arrest, detention, torture, even public execution. There is a system of labor camps including the renowned prison No. 15, which reportedly houses 6,000 Christians alone. But despite severe oppression, there is a growing underground church movement of an estimated 400,000 Christians. We have written on North Korea several times in the past year. At the bottom are some noteworthy articles you can read in order to become more familiar with the brutal hardship that is endured by the Christians of North Korea. You can also read about North Korea’s hidden gulag, below all of the links, and visit the website that published The Hidden Gulag Report.

African countries surge – Open Doors reports that persecution of Christians in Africa vastly increased in 2012. Mali is a newcomer on the list and holds the No. 7 position. Tanzania (No. 24), Kenya (No. 40), Uganda (47) and Niger (No. 50) also moved onto the World Watch List and Ethiopia is one of the strongest risers (from No. 38 to No. 15) on the list. In addition, the small African country of Eritrea made the Top 10 for the first time at No. 10. Libya climbed from No. 26 to No. 17.

Syria made the largest jump on the World Watch List. The country is No. 11 on the list, compared to No. 36 in 2012.

Christians are persecuted in at least 60 countries for their faith. They suffer interrogation, arrest and even death in some of the most dangerous and restrictive countries in the world. For 58 years Open Doors has supported and strengthened believers worldwide through Bible and Christian literature distribution, leadership training and assistance, Christian community development and prayer and presence ministry. To partner with Open Doors USA, call toll free at 888-5-BIBLE-5 (888-524-2535) or go to our Website at http://www.OpenDoorsUSA.org.

Related articles

From around the web

The Hidden Gulag

Second Edition

The Lives and Voices of
“Those Who are Sent to the Mountains”

David Hawk

Description: Based on extensive interviews with over 60 defectors and more than 40 satellite photos of North Korean political prisoner camps, the report calls for the dismantlement of the vast North Korean gulag system in which 150,000 to 200,000 are incarcerated.

From Page 158: In the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, crimes against humanity are committed against persons sent to the political penal labor colonies. Evidence shows that:

1. Perceived or suspected “wrong-doers” or “wrong-thinkers,” or in some instances, persons with“wrong-knowledge,”123 and/or their family from the DPRK State Security Agency,124 which refuses to acknowledge the deprivation of freedom and refuses to provide information on the fate or whereabouts of those persons with the intent of removing those persons from the “protection of law” for a prolonged period of time.

2. The abducted persons are subjected to deportation or forcible transfer from the area in which they were lawfully present without grounds permitted under international law.

3. The abducted and deported persons are deposited at distant, remote, penal labor colonies or encampments, where they are subjected to “imprisonment or severe deprivation of physi- cal liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law.”129 These abductions, deporta- tions and the subsequent imprisonments all take place without any judicial process. There is no arrest, charge, trial, conviction or sentence, as provided in the DPRK Criminal Code and the DPRK Criminal Procedures Code.

4.The prolonged, indefinite detention of family members is a violation of Article 26 of the ICCPR, “…the law shall prohibit any discrimi- nation and guarantee to all persons equal and effective protection against discrimination on any ground such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” The imprisonment of family members amounts to what the ICC Statute terms as “persecu- tion.” Most family members of suspected wrong-doers or wrong-thinkers are detained for the rest of their lives in sections of the prison camps termed “total control zones.”

5. Once cut off from any contact with the coun- try or world outside of the prison camp, including former family and friends, the imprisoned persons are subjected, usually for a lifetime, to arduous forced labor under extremely severe circumstances. This begins with the provision of below subsistence level food rations.

7. Prisoners are regularly subjected to beatings and sometimes more systematic torture for infractions of prison camp regulations and during interrogations.

8.On numerous occasions, prisoners compelled to observe executions (which are carried out publicly to demonstrate to other prisoners the severe consequences of escape attempts and/or non-compliance with camp regulations) …

9. Prison camp officials and guards are regularly able to exact sexual relations with female prison- ers under circumstances that have been judged to constitute rape or sexual violence …

These are just a few excerpts from the CONCLUSIONS in the Hidden Gulag Report. You can read the entire report here – http://www.hrnk.org/uploads/pdfs/HRNK_HiddenGulag2_Web_5-18.pdf

Photo via Google satellite via stormfront.org –

the rear of a secret Gulag (internment camp for Christians)

Where Christian Persecution is Worst

World Watch List 2013

Created by Open Doors, the World Watch List (WWL) is a ranking of 50 countries where persecution of Christians for religious reasons is worst. The list covers persecution of Christians of all denominations in an entire country and focuses on persecution for their faith, not persecution for political, economic, social, ethnic or accidental reasons. VIDEO by Open Doors USA

Open Doors World Watch List 2012

The top 10 countries where the persecution of Christians is most severe… The church around the world is facing times which are unprecedented in many ways. For the tenth year in succession, the Open Doors World Watch List is topped by North Korea, and in places as diverse as Libya, North Korea, Pakistan and Burma, significant events are shaping society. But despite the many hardships, the body of Christ continues to grow.

Find out more about our World Watch List by visiting the Open Doors website: http://www.opendoorsuk.org/countries VIDEO by Open Doors UK & Ireland

In Awe of God’s Creation – Birds that fly 6 months straight without rest – Pasarea care zboara 6 luni fara pauza – Coplesit de Creatia lui Dumnezeu

For English, scroll down below video.

ROMANIAN:

Alpine Swift (Tachymarptis melba)Poate o pasăre să stea în aer 6 luni în şir, fără odihnă? Un studiu recent a arătat că, oricât de neverosimil ar părea, o specie din acest grup petrece 200 de zile consecutive în aer, fără a se aşeza să se odihnească nici măcar după lunga migraţie care o duce din Europa până în Africa. (photo wikipedia)

Pasărea capabilă de o astfel de performanţă este drepneaua alpină (Tachymarptis melba), o specie care cuibăreşte în Eurasia şi migrează iarna în Africa.

Biologii de la Institutul Ornitologic Elveţian din Sempach au studiat 3 exemplare de drepnea alpină, ataşându-le acestora dispozitive de înregistrare a datelor, cu greutatea de 1,5 grame, pentrui a înregistra acceleraţia mişcării păsărilor şi localizarea lor geografică.

Rezutatele măsurătorilor sugerează că, timp de 200 de zile, toate cele 3 drepnele alpine au rămas în aer, zburând întruna, în cursul migraţiei şi al iernării lor în Africa.

Specialiştii spun că, până acum, o  activitate neîntreruptă atât de îndelungată a mai fost observată doar la unele animale marine. Drepnelele se hrănesc cu insecte, pe care le prind din zbor, şi aproape sigur dorm tot în aer, cred mulţi oameni de ştiinţă. Despre multe păsări migratoare se crede că ar dormi în timp ce zboară, deşi nu există o explicaţie unanima acceptată a modului în care pot face acest lucru. S-a presupus că păsările dorm doar în perioade de câteva secunde, ori că folosesc doar o jumătate a creierului, în timp ce celalaltă jumătate se odihneşte.

Însă alţi cercetători cred că, de fapt, drepnelele nu dorm deloc timp de mai multe luni; asemenea comportamente au fost, de altfel , înregistrate şi la alte animale. Studii anterioare au arătat că delfinii şi balenele pot fi active timp de 90 de zile, fără să doarmă deloc în acest răstimp, şi că păsări precum fugacii pătaţi pot sta treze săptămâni întregi în perioada împerecherii. Aceşti specialişti cred că, dacă adaptarea impune animalelor să stea treze perioade lungi de timp, atunci acestea pot să atingă astfel de performanţe; în acest caz, ideea că unele păsări ar dormi în zbor este incorectă şi nu este imposibil ca, în realitate, aceste păsări să nu doarmă timp de mai multe luni.

VIDEO

An old furnace building with a tall brick chimney at Rio Lindo Adventist Academy in Healdsburg, Calif. is now an important roosting site for Vaux’s swifts on their southward migration each fall. The swifts are small enough that thousands can pack themselves into chimneys overnight.
Video credit: Charles Chadwick VIDEO by KQED

ENGLISH:

Alpine SwiftSwifts stay airborne for six months at a time. (Photo wikipedia)

Swifts are said to spend most of their lives airborne, but no one has ever proved this. Now, a study suggests there’s some truth to it: alpine swifts spend more than six consecutive months aloft, not even resting after migrating to north Africa following their breeding season in Europe.

„Up to now, such long-lasting locomotive activity had been reported only for animals living in the sea,” says Felix Liechti of the Swiss Ornithological Institute in Sempach.

Liechti and his colleagues attached 1.5-gram data loggers to three alpine swifts (Tachymarptis melba) at a Swiss breeding site, and recaptured the birds the following year. The loggers recorded the birds’ acceleration and geographic location. The measurements suggest that for 200 days, all three swifts remained airborne while migrating to and wintering in Africa.

Liechti says researchers have previously asserted but never proved that newborn common swifts spend three years aloft before landing for breeding.

„Amazing, truly amazing,” says Carsten Egevang of the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources in Nuuk of Liechti’s findings. „We knew that swifts stay on the wing for long periods, but 200 days is very impressive.”

The birds survive on airborne plankton, and almost certainly sleep on the wing too, Liechti says. „It has been assumed that the birds ‘sleep’ only for seconds, or use only one half of the brain while the other half is resting,” he says.

But some researchers think the swifts might not sleep at all. „Our group has shown that dolphins and killer whales remain active for at least 90 days without sleep and with greatly reduced sleep for up to 150 days after birth,” says Jerry Siegel of the University of California at Los Angeles. He also cites recent work showing that sandpipers stay awake for weeks during breeding, and that dolphins can function without impaired performance for as long as 15 days without sleep.

„What all this work tells us is that when it is adaptive for animals to remain awake, evolution allows that, so I think the idea that swifts must sleep and are therefore ‘sleep-flying’ is incorrect,” says Siegel.

Journal reference: Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3554 Story from descopera.ro and http://www.newscientist.com

25 Christian churches and schools to be demolished in Nigeria

Voice of the Martyrs Canada reports via http://www.mnnonline.org:

Government authorities in northern Nigeria’s Borno state plan to demolish 25 churches and schools, ostensibly to make room for new housing. However, no plans for the housing development have been produced, says Voice of the Martyrs Canada. Christian leaders believe this is yet another attempt by local governments in northern Nigeria to persecute the Christian minority.

The proposed demolitions would compound the security challenges that these believers are already facing from the militant group, Boko Haram. „We have seen the eviction notice from the Borno state government,” says Dr. Asake, general secretary of the Christian Association of Nigeria. „We are Nigerians, and there are other places where the state government can develop. The areas earmarked for demolition are already developed with churches and schools. Christians have already suffered enough in Borno state.”

Pray that the demolitions will not go through, and that God would maintain these places for worship, education, and meeting. Pray that these Nigerians will be successful in sharing the gospel with their Muslim neighbors.

Beniamin Fărăgău povestește – Era un sat in care atunci când pețeai mireasa… The Tale of the Eight-Cow Wife

VEZI aici si – VLADIMIR PUSTAN povesteste: Am fost rugat sa particip la o cununie…

Photo credit www.artprintcollection.com

Am auzit o poveste…

Era un sat în care atunci când îti pețeai mireasa dadeai o vaca tatălui miresei pentru ea. Si în felul acesta era practic cererea in casatorie.

Și era o fată in satul respectiv foarte rușinoasă, tot timpul cu capul plecat când mergea la fântấnă și toți baieții râdeau de ea.

A venit un flăcău și a adus 8 vaci. Și a venit la tatal ei și a zis, „Am venit sa pețesc mireasa. Tatal ei s-a uitat cruciș la el, „Nimeni n-a facut așa ceva vreodata în satul nostru”. Toată lumea a râs de el.

El a lăsat vacile. Și-a luat mireasa și s-a dus acasa.

Nu a trecut foarte mult timp și cineva îi bate la ușa, unul dintre prietenii lui.  O doamnă cu fața senina, înaltă, frumoasă deschide ușa și-l invită în casă. Și omul nostru rămâne absolut buimac. „Asta este fata rușinoasă din satul nostru?”

Nu știu câtă  încredere avem in soțiile noastre. Nu uitați, frica, suspiciunea, neîncrederea ucide vasul slab de lângă noi. Ca ea să poată  înflori trebuie să ai încredere in ea.

VEZI aici si – VLADIMIR PUSTAN povesteste: Am fost rugat sa particip la o cununie…

POVESTIREA #2 O povestire reala

Dati-mi voie sa va aduc o poveste reala. Era prin anii ’80 si Dumnezeu, in raspuns la rugaciunile noastre a inceput sa ne aduca invatatori dupa cerintele, sau daca vreti, dupa nivelul intrebarilor noastre. Si cineva, undeva, pe alt continent, in America de Nord, i-a dat o ideie ca sa aduca in Romania tot corpul profesional de la Wheaton College. Si fiecare vara ducea 2,3. Stateam ascunsi cu ei prin paduri, prin apartamente si de dimineata pana seara studiam Scriptura. Si unul dintre ei, tin minte, era o vara torida, eram in Oradea, era Paul DeVree(?), seful catedrei de filozofie de la Wheaton College.

Avea o problema serioasa de ochi. Se vedea cand te uitai la el si ochelarii pe care-i purta. SI intr-o zi ne-a povestit viata Lui. S-a nascut cu problema asta de ochi si cand s-a dus la scoala n-a spus nimanui ca el nu vede tabla, nu vede ce-i scris acolo. Va dati seama cum aratau caietele lui, cum aratau lucrarile lui. Abia ca s-a tarat peste clasa IV-a. In clasa IV-a a trebuit sa dea un examen pentru pregatirea in clasa V-a. La lucrarea de la matematica i-au gresit lucrarea, i-au incurcat-o. I-au dat o nota foarte mare. Hai sa zicem, in limba Romana, un 9. A intrat in clasa V-a, notele la matematica 2, 2. A venit profesoara la el si a zis, „Paul, nu se poate. Uite aici lucrarea ta. Tu esti un baiat de nota 9, nu de 2. Stiti ce a spus el? „Am terminat liceul primul din clasa.”

Spuneti-mi, ce l-a propulsat pe Paul de la 2 la 10? Increderea, incurajarea. Profesoara de matematica, mai tarziu, a aflat povestea. A fost corectata lucrarea lui. Poate ca ai o sotie de nota 2. Oare, iubirea ta ar putea sa faca din ea un ajutor potrivit de nota 9? Cel putin. De aceea va lăsa omul pe tatăl său şi pe mamă-sa, şi se va lipi de nevastă-sa, şi cei doi vor fi un singur trup` Nu stiu daca simtiti greutatea acestui „de aceea”. Ca sa iubeasca „ca şi Hristos Biserica” si sa o ajute astfel in devenirea ei.

Vezi PAGINA – Beniamin Faragau aici

READ this story here, in the ENGLISH language:

Photo credit missjintanzania.primaryblogger.co.uk

The Tale of the Eight-Cow Wife

Once there was a missionary whose ministry was to a small community of tribes in Africa. One of the more quirky traditions of the tribe was the process for choosing a spouse.

When a father deemed that his daughter was old enough to be married, he announced it. Over the next few days and weeks, the eligible bachelors communicated their desire to marry her by tying cows to the father’s fence.

In the end, the one who had paid the most cows got the girl (and the dad got the cows).

Obviously, the more of the traits of a good wife (culturally) that a woman demonstrated, the more cows she would bring. If she were kind, submissive, smart, beautiful, etc., then she might bring 4 or 5 cows (6 was the record). Others might get 2 or 3 cows.

The missionary was mentoring a number of young Christian men preparing them to be ministers for their own people. One, in particular, he was friends with. This young man had committing himself to finding the greatest wife ever. He insisted that he would keep looking until he found an “8-cow wife.”

Despite the protests of the parents and the missionary, the young man was intent … and unmarried.

Eventually, the missionary was called back home for a furlough break. While home, he received a telegram from the village. “_________ married, eight-cow wife”.

The missionary was intrigued and couldn’t wait to get back to the village to find out more.

When he finally did, he went straight to the young man’s house and was welcomed in by the gentlest, most deferential, beautiful young lady he had ever seen. As the men sat to talk, she served them kindly and was clearly very smart. She brightened the room in every way.

Stunned, the old missionary proclaimed, “You did it. I must admit that you have found an eight-cow wife indeed!  Where did you find her?”

The young man replied, “Oh, that is _________ from the next village.”

The missionary was surprised. “I knew her, certainly she was a kind and pretty girl, but, no offense, I would not have thought of her as an eight-cow wife, and certainly I would never have recognized this wife as her!”

The young man smiled and said “After you left I searched and searched and was despairing of ever finding my eight cow wife when I believe God intervened. I believe He revealed to me this truth: there was one way to get an eight-cow wife. I chose a woman and paid eight cows for her.”

 ~~~~

Moral of the story: We can  imagine what it did to the young lady of character, when a man chose her so certainly and with such finality, and in doing so making her the only eight-cow wife in the history of the community!

source Crosswalk.com – http://www.crosswalk.com/blogs/chris-legg/the-8-cow-wife-story.html

Presedintele tarii Camerun vrea sa inchida toate Bisericile Penticostale

Church service in Cameroon. Photo credit Elin B Flickr Creative Commons

Guvernul din Camerun a inchis aprox. 50 de biserici Penticostale, ale unei denominatii care nu este recunoscuta de guvernul din Camerun, dar intentia lor este sa inchida toate bisericile Penticostale (majoritatea populatiei este crestina in Camerun si se estimeaza aprox. 100 de biserici din cele 500 vor fi inchise in curand). Guvernul acuza bisericile Penticostale de a mima minuni si a-si omora cetateni din bisericile lor, de a fi galagiosi, si in acelasi timp. guvernul cere ca toate bisericile sa se inregistreze . Guvernul da autorizatie doar  bisericilor Catolice, Presbyteriene, Baptiste, Musulmane si cateva alte biserici.

Unele dintre cazuri pentru care se ia o decizie atat de dura e faptul ca unii enoriasi refuza tratament pentru anumite boli din cauza credintei lor, iar un caz citat a fost o fetita de 9 ani care a murit in timp ce pastorul se ruga pentru ea, zicand ca era demonizata. O femeie citata se plange ca toti copii ei au fugit de la Biserica Catolica la biserica Penticostala. Mai jos, raportul de la Christian Post:

Zeci de biserici penticostale au fost închise în Camerun, după ce autoritățile guvernamentale s-au sesizat privind presupuse „practici criminale” care ar avea loc în cadrul lăcașurilor de închinare. Photo on right www.cia.gov )

Președintele Paul Biya, aflat la putere din anul 1982, a ordonat luna trecută închiderea mai multor biserici penticostale, invocând motive de securitate publică.

„Vom elimina toți acei așa-ziși pastori creștini penticostali care se folosesc de numele lui Isus Christos pentru a mima miracole și a omorî cetățeni în bisericile lor. Și-au întins libertățile la maximum”, a spus Mbu Anthony Lang, un oficial guvernamental din Camerun, citat de BosNewsLife, în Christian Post.

Acuzațiile aduse la adresa celor câteva zeci de biserici (între care zece aflate chiar în capitala Yaounde) au inclus „șantaj”, „gălăgia nocturnă repetată” și „prozelitism”, a adăugat Ministrul Comunicațiilor Issa Tchiroma Bakary.

„Autoritățile administrative responsabile de păstrarea ordinii publice au fost nevoite să își asume responsabilitatea”, a mai spus Bakary într-o conferință de presă care a avut loc săptămâna trecută.

Sursele:

The story of Katie Davis: The high school senior who went to Uganda to teach kindergarten for 10 months and stayed to be mom to 13 orphans and to serve the people of Uganda

Photo credit www.21st-century-christianity.com
A story of a young woman who radically changed her life’s path during a ministry trip to Uganda, and instead of going to college she answered God’s call to serve the needs of the people of Uganda. When she left the US, Katie was homecoming queen, at the top of her class, president of her class, and she could have gotten into any college she desired. Yet, she said, „No. I am going to go to Uganda. There are people hurting there and I’ve got to take care of them.”

Katie Davis left over Christmas break her senior year for a short mission trip to Uganda and her life was turned completely inside out.

Katie with her 14 children (at the age of 21) Photo credit itsmeroxy.wordpress.com

Some quotes from Katie:

  • Jesus does not ask us to care for those less fortunate than us, He demands it.
  • When calling ourselves Christ followers, caring for the orphan, the widow and the desolate is not an option, it’s a requirement.

(1) Katie Davis interview with David Platt

beautyforashes613

Kisses from Katie:

A Story of Relentless Love and Redemption

(2) 700 Club Interview

VIDEO by The700ClubEurope

Northern Nigeria under State of Emergency

Nigeria State of Emergency BBC
The three Northeastern states, where yesterday,
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan has declared a state of emergency
after a series of deadly attacks by Islamist militant groups.

via MissionNewsNetwork.com photos – map and Nigerian president below via http://www.bbc.co.uk

Nigeria (ODM/MNN) ― Open Doors USA has issued an urgent appeal for prayer after receiving news that suspected Boko Haram terrorists attacked the predominantly Nigerian Christian village of Zangan in southern Kaduna around midnight on Monday.It was the latest in a string of attacks that prompted a State of Emergency.

Open Doors spokesman Jerry Dykstra says they’re still trying to determine the details of what happened, but so far, „Open Doors says it understands an ‘entire village’ has been destroyed: burnt down, many people are fleeing after the attack.”

The village chief’s residence was reportedly burnt to the ground, and the village chief’s whereabouts remains unknown after he fled Zangan. Churches and homes were among the buildings destroyed in the attack.

Goodluck JonathanDykstra says this attack came after an earlier threat and days of uncertainty. „The report that we got from Open Doors in Africa said that they had been threatened before by the Boko Haram. They were living in fear almost daily. In that area, many schools have been closed down because of that.”

„We do not have any more details at this stage, but we understand that this area saw a similar attack about four weeks ago. Open Doors urges prayer for the people of southern Kaduna state and Zangan village in particular.” Police say 19 people died in that earlier attack.

Open Doors has been active in Nigeria since 1997. Over the last few years, „The Boko Haram actually wants to take over the whole country and put into effect Sharia Law,” explains Dykstra. Their attacks–which are estimated to have cost 3,600 lives since 2009–have included suicide blasts as well as coordinated gun and bomb assaults on houses of worship, Christian centers, security forces, schools and other symbols of authority. All that means the Open Doors response teams have seen dramatic growth in the outreach they do.

With the Boko Haram targeting church leaders and Christian adults, that leaves an untold number of orphans and widows. Open Doors projects target schooling for the children, as well as socio-economic projects for widows of Christian leaders who have been killed. Dykstra adds, „We support the Christians there in emergency situations with trauma counseling. We do a lot of care for Muslim-Background Believers, distribution of Bibles, Sunday school training, assistance to Christians in Sharia-controlled States in the North.”

Nigeria is ranked No. 13 on the Open Doors 2013 World Watch List (www.worldwatchlist.us ) of the worst persecutors of Christians in the world.

It’s unlikely that this pattern will change much. Aside from the physical help, Dyskstra says Nigerian believers are asking for wisdom in their response. „I think we need to pray for Christians not to strike back. The Christian leaders are urging–especially the youth–not to retaliate. That would kind of just recycle this pattern of violence.”

Watch the video of Nigerian President Jonathan declaring the state of emergency here – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa

Mary Slessor – Missionary to 1800’s Nigeria

SEE FILM BELOW + see links to other biographical films at bottom of post.

Mary-slessor-and-adopted-children

Mary Slessor, inspired by the life of Dr. David Livingstone set out for West Africa at the age of 28. Undaunted  by two illnesses, one of them being malaria, which forced her to return to Scotland for a short period, by the witchcraft, and the one case of ritual slaughter practiced by the natives, she learned the native language, lived with and like the natives and moved further and further into unbroken territory- Efik and Okoyong of Calabar, in present day Nigeria. Along the way she established missions and adopted every baby she found due to the ritual killing of twins that is still practiced in some Nigerian villages today. (See here- 40 Abuja Towns Kill Twins! (stharry.wordpress.com) ) Besides being an evangelist, Mary Slessor also concentrated on settling disputes, encouraging trade, establishing social changes and introducing Western education. In 1892 she was made vice-consul in Okoyong, presiding over the native court and in 1905 was named vice-president of Ikot Obong native court. Slessor suffered failing health in her later years but remained in Africa where she died in 1915.

If you think all Victorian women were ladies in lavender crinolines swooning at the sight of a mouse, think again. There were a surprising number who went off into the unknown alone, and the bravest was a Scottish missionary called Mary Slessor. She became a legend in Scotland and in Nigeria, where she is still celebrated today. When she first went to Africa in 1876 the Scottish church had bee established on the Nigerian coast for many years but the interior was largely unexplored. This fascinating two-part documentary explores her life and works, from her early childhood in Aberdeen to the work she carried out improving trading and the living standards of women in Nigeria.

Part 1

Part 2

Mary Slessor was born on December 2, 1848 in Gilcomston, close to Aberdeen, Scotland. She was the second of seven children of Robert and Mary Slessor. Her father, originally from Buchan, was a shoemaker by trade. In 1859 the family moved to Dundee in search of work. Robert Slessor was an alcoholic, and unable to keep up shoemaking, took a job as a labourer in a mill. Her mother, a skilled weaver, also went to work in the mills. At the age of eleven, Mary began work as a „half timer” in the Baxter Brothers’ Mill. She spent half of her day at a school provided by the mill owners, and the other half working for the company. The Slessors lived in the slums of Dundee. Before long, Mary’s father died of pneumonia, and both her brothers died, leaving behind only Mary, her mother, and two sisters. By age fourteen, Mary had become a skilled jute worker, working from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. with just an hour for breakfast and lunch.

Mary’s mother was a devout Presbyterians who read each issue of the Missionary Record, a monthly magazine published by The United Presbyterian Church (later United Free Church of Scotland) to inform members of missionary activities and needs. Mary developed an interest in religion and, when a mission was instituted in Quarry Pend (close by the Wishart Church), Mary volunteered to become a teacher. Mary was 27 when she heard news that David Livingstone, the famous missionary and explorer, had died. She wanted to follow in his footsteps.

Missionary

Eventually, Mary applied to the Foreign Mission Board of the United Presbyterian Church. After a of training in Edinburgh, Mary set sail in the S.S. Ethiopia on 5 August 1876, and arrived at her destination in West Africa just over a month later. She was 28 years of age, red haired with bright blue eyes. Mary was sent to the Calabar region, warned that witchcraft and superstition were prevalent. The ritual sacrifice of children, and twins in particular, was customary among the people she would be ministering to, but Mary was undaunted. She worked first in the missions in Old Town and Creek Town. She lived in the missionary compound for 3 years. She wanted to go deeper into Calabar, malaria forced her to go home to Scotland and recover. Mary left Calabar for Dundee in 1879. She was in Scotland for 16 months before heading back to Africa.

On her return, she did not go back to the compound, but 3 miles further into Calabar, to Old Town. As she had to leave a large portion of her salary at home for the support of her mother and sisters, she had to economise and took to subsisting on the native food.

Issues that Mary confronted as a young missionary included widespread human sacrifice at the death of a village elder, who, it was believed, required servants and retainers to accompany him in the next world, and the lack of education or any status for women. The birth of twins was considered an evil curse. The belief was that the father of one of the infants was an evil spirit, and that the mother had been guilty of a great sin; and as they were allowed to live. Twin babies were often abandoned in the bush. In such circumstances as soon as twins missioners sought to obtain possession of them, and gave them the security and care of the Mission House. Some of the Mission compounds were alive with babies.Mary adopted every child that she found abandoned. She once saved a pair of twins, a boy and a girl, but the boy did not survive. Mary was devastated, but took the girl as her daughter and called her Janie.

After only three more years, she went back to Scotland on yet another furlough because she was extremely sick. But she wasn’t alone this time, she had Janie with her. She was home for over 3 years looking after her mother and sister, who had also fallen ill. While she was home, Mary spoke at churches all over and shared stories from Africa.

According to Livingstone, when two deputies went out to inspect the Mission in 1881-82, they were much impressed. They stated, “…[S]he enjoys the unreserved friendship and confidence of the people, and has much influence over them.” This they attributed partly to the singular ease with which she spoke the language.

Mary again returned to Africa, with more determination then ever. She saved hundreds of twins out of the fierce jungle, where they had been left either to starve to death or get eaten by wild animals. She prevented dozens, possibly even hundreds of wars, helped heal the sick and stopped the practice of determining guilt by making the suspects drink poison. She went to other tribes, spreading the word of Jesus Christ wherever and whenever she could. While in Africa, she received news that her mother and sister had died. She was overcome with loneliness. She wrote,”There is no one to write and tell my stories and nonsense to.” She had also found a sense of writing, ”Heaven is now nearer to me than Britain,and no one will worry about me if I go up country.”

In August 1888, she went traveled north to Okoyong, an area where missionaries were previously killed, but Mary was sure that her teachings, and the fact that she was a woman, would be less threatening to unreached tribes than male missionaries had been. For 15 years, she stayed with the Okoyong. She was a peacemaker and a nurse. She died when she was 66.

Among the Efik

Unlike other missionaries, Mary lived as part of the tribe, learned to speak Efik, the native language, and made close personal friendships wherever she went. She adopted abandoned twins and worked tirelessly to protect children and raise the status of women. Mary was known for her pragmatism and humour; this earned her the respect and trust of the people she wanted to serve.

Mary Slessor went to live among the Efik and the Okoyong which lived near the Efiks who live in Calabar, in present day Nigeria. There she successfully fought against the killing of twins at infancy. Mary Slessor was a driving force behind the establishment of the Hope Waddell Training Institute in Calabar, which provided practical vocational training to Africans.

Death

In 1888 she went alone to work among the Okoyong. For the rest of her life Slessor lived a simple life in a traditional house with Africans, concentrating on pioneering. Her insistence on lone stations often led her into conflict with the authorities and gained her a reputation as somewhat eccentric, but she was heralded in Britain as the ‘white queen of Okoyong’. She was not primarily an evangelist but concentrated on settling disputes, encouraging trade, establishing social changes and introducing Western education. Slessor frequently campaigned against injustices against women, took in outcasts and adopted unwanted children. In 1892 she was made vice-consul in Okoyong, presiding over the native court and in 1905 was named vice-president of Ikot Obong native court. In 1913 she was awarded the Order of St John of Jerusalem. Slessor suffered failing health in her later years but remained in Africa where she died in 1915.

Mary Slessor died in 1915 at her remote station near Use Ikot Oku. Her body was transported down the Cross River to Duke Town for the colonial equivalent of a state funeral. Attendees at her funeral included the Provincial Commissioner along with other senior British Officials in full uniform. Her Coffin was wrapped in the Union Jack. Flags at government buildings were flown at half mast and the Governor General of Nigeria, Sir Fredrick Lugard telegraphed his ‘deepest regret’ from Lagos and published a warm tribute in the Government Gazette. WIKIPEDIA link – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Slessor

Taramul interzis (In cautarea Dr Livingstone) Film subtitrat

Citeste Biografia detailata a Dr. Livingstone aici – (fa click pe translator in partea dreapta, sus pe blog sub globul cu steaguri, fa click pe Romanian si va traduce orice pagina a blogului in Limba Romana). LINKUL pentru biografie – https://rodiagnusdei.wordpress.com/2013/01/07/dr-david-livingstone-missionary-explorer-and-discoverer-of-uncharted-territory-in-africa/

Carte de visite of David Livingstone

Carte de vizita David Livingstone (Photo credit: Smithsonian Institution)

Un film despre cautarea legendarului misionar si explorator, Dr.David Livingstone, realizat de corespondentul ziarului New Zork Harlod in Africa centrala, Henry Stanley. Traverseaza vietile lui Stanley si Livingstone de la faimoasa lor intalnire din 10 noiembrie 1871 pana la moartea lui Livingstone in mai 1873.

Contemporary illustration of the famous meetin...

Contemporary illustration of the famous meeting between Henry Morton Stanley and David Livingstone on November 10, 1871 in Ujiji. The Illustrated London News, 1872. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Taramul interzis (subtitrare in limba romana) 90 minute.

FILM in ENGLEZA – David Livingstone

In awe of God’s Creation – Namibian nights (video) Noapte in Namibia – Coplesit de creatia lui Dumnezeu

Filmat in Deadvlei, Namibia. Fiecare secunda de video contine 30 de poze. In total, fotograful a facut 16,000 de poze intr-o perioada de 2 ani ai proiectului de fata. Acest video scurt a castigat locul intai la Premiile Fotografului Anului 2012.

Quivertrees and the eery, dead camelthorn trees filmed in Deadvlei, Namibia. Each second of video consists of 30 photographs. In total, Marsel shot more than 16,000 images over a period of two years for this project. The video won First Prize in the 2012 Travel Photographer Of The Year Awards.

In caz ca nu va apare playerul faceti click aici- http://www.vimeo.com/57130400

If the player does not load click here – http://www.vimeo.com/57130400

Namibian Nights from Squiver on Vimeo.

Stiri Crestine – Liderul Hamas in Gaza si Speranta in misiune in Africa

Poza de la Misiunea Speranta- Vezi albumul aici – http://www.speranta.ro

Misiunea Speranta isi va face din nou misunea in Africa  24 februarie – 9 martie 2013. Citeste mai multe aici – http://speranta.ro
Mai multe stiri crestine gasiti pe site-ul http://alfaomega.tv/stiri
  1. Din sumarul editiei:Hamas: Nu vom ceda „Palestina” niciodata
  2. Eforturile de evanghelizare dau roade intr-un cartier rau famat din New York
  3. Gracia Burnham la 10 ani de la rapire
  4. Victimele taifunului din Filipine sunt ajutate de catre voluntarii americani
  5. Tinerii din ziua de azi sunt mai expusi pornografiei mai mult ca niciodata
  6. Documentarul „Pink Room” prezinta lupta impotriva traficului de sex
  7. Raport de misiune: Misiunea Speranta in Africa

Open Doors USA releases its world ranking of persecution by country – North Korea still #1, Mali newcomer to list #7

WWL-Main-Download

Information and watch list from  the non denominational group http://www.OpenDoorsUSA.org.  Rankings released  January 8,2013

North Korea – For the eleventh year running, this is the most difficult place on earth to be a Christian. In a country of 24.5 million, there are just 400,000 Christians. North Korea is one of the remaining Communist states, and it is vehemently opposed to religion of any kind. Christians are classified as hostile and face arrest, detention, torture, even public execution. There is a system of labor camps including the renowned prison No. 15, which reportedly houses 6,000 Christians alone. But despite severe oppression, there is a growing underground church movement of an estimated 400,000 Christians. We have written on North Korea several times in the past year. At the bottom are some noteworthy articles you can read in order to become more familiar with the brutal hardship that is endured by the Christians of North Korea. You can also read about North Korea’s hidden gulag, below all of the links, and visit the website that published The Hidden Gulag Report.

African countries surge – Open Doors reports that persecution of Christians in Africa vastly increased in 2012. Mali is a newcomer on the list and holds the No. 7 position. Tanzania (No. 24), Kenya (No. 40), Uganda (47) and Niger (No. 50) also moved onto the World Watch List and Ethiopia is one of the strongest risers (from No. 38 to No. 15) on the list. In addition, the small African country of Eritrea made the Top 10 for the first time at No. 10. Libya climbed from No. 26 to No. 17.

Syria made the largest jump on the World Watch List. The country is No. 11 on the list, compared to No. 36 in 2012.

Christians are persecuted in at least 60 countries for their faith. They suffer interrogation, arrest and even death in some of the most dangerous and restrictive countries in the world. For 58 years Open Doors has supported and strengthened believers worldwide through Bible and Christian literature distribution, leadership training and assistance, Christian community development and prayer and presence ministry. To partner with Open Doors USA, call toll free at 888-5-BIBLE-5 (888-524-2535) or go to our Website at http://www.OpenDoorsUSA.org.

Related articles

From around the web

The Hidden Gulag

Second Edition

The Lives and Voices of
“Those Who are Sent to the Mountains”

David Hawk

Description: Based on extensive interviews with over 60 defectors and more than 40 satellite photos of North Korean political prisoner camps, the report calls for the dismantlement of the vast North Korean gulag system in which 150,000 to 200,000 are incarcerated.

From Page 158: In the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, crimes against humanity are committed against persons sent to the political penal labor colonies. Evidence shows that:

1. Perceived or suspected “wrong-doers” or “wrong-thinkers,” or in some instances, persons with“wrong-knowledge,”123 and/or their family from the DPRK State Security Agency,124 which refuses to acknowledge the deprivation of freedom and refuses to provide information on the fate or whereabouts of those persons with the intent of removing those persons from the “protection of law” for a prolonged period of time.

2. The abducted persons are subjected to deportation or forcible transfer from the area in which they were lawfully present without grounds permitted under international law.

3. The abducted and deported persons are deposited at distant, remote, penal labor colonies or encampments, where they are subjected to “imprisonment or severe deprivation of physi- cal liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law.”129 These abductions, deporta- tions and the subsequent imprisonments all take place without any judicial process. There is no arrest, charge, trial, conviction or sentence, as provided in the DPRK Criminal Code and the DPRK Criminal Procedures Code.

4.The prolonged, indefinite detention of family members is a violation of Article 26 of the ICCPR, “…the law shall prohibit any discrimi- nation and guarantee to all persons equal and effective protection against discrimination on any ground such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.” The imprisonment of family members amounts to what the ICC Statute terms as “persecu- tion.” Most family members of suspected wrong-doers or wrong-thinkers are detained for the rest of their lives in sections of the prison camps termed “total control zones.”

5. Once cut off from any contact with the coun- try or world outside of the prison camp, including former family and friends, the imprisoned persons are subjected, usually for a lifetime, to arduous forced labor under extremely severe circumstances. This begins with the provision of below subsistence level food rations.

7. Prisoners are regularly subjected to beatings and sometimes more systematic torture for infractions of prison camp regulations and during interrogations.

8.On numerous occasions, prisoners compelled to observe executions (which are carried out publicly to demonstrate to other prisoners the severe consequences of escape attempts and/or non-compliance with camp regulations) …

9. Prison camp officials and guards are regularly able to exact sexual relations with female prison- ers under circumstances that have been judged to constitute rape or sexual violence …

These are just a few excerpts from the  CONCLUSIONS in the Hidden Gulag Report. You can read the entire report here – http://www.hrnk.org/uploads/pdfs/HRNK_HiddenGulag2_Web_5-18.pdf

Photo via Google satellite via stormfront.org –

the rear of a secret Gulag (internment camp for Christians)

Dr. David Livingstone – Missionary, Explorer and Discoverer of Uncharted Territory in 1800’s Africa

An inspirational  Christian biography to share with your family:

An introduction to David Livingstone from Ravi Zacharias (9 minutes) from LovingTheTruth1

Sometimes you wonder how God gives us desire for one subject matter, or another, while we attend school, and, how that eventually plays out in the trajectory of our lives, all under His sovereign plan for our lives. Dr. David Livingston loved science, to the chagrin of his father, who thought it could ruin his son’s faith. Yet, Dr. Livingstone’s science background, especially the fact that he was a medical doctor, was extremely valuable to him in his travels throughout Africa where malaria and dysentery was a regular occurrence . But, even more important was his love for geography, which fueled Dr. Livingstone’s desire to find the source of the River Nile; something which he failed to do, but it took him on journeys across a vast expanse of far off lands. How better to proclaim the Christ he believed in, and worshipped, than by traveling through a vast expanse of land in pursuit of a scientific quest. He did have some success as he  eventually charted some previously unknown lakes and river tributaries. (Also, see the second map in this article- it is a hand drawn map by Dr. Livingstone’s own hand, and it has amazing accuracy and precision when checked against later maps). One of the lesser known facts is that the same Mr. Stanley, a journalist who set to find out what happened to Dr. Livingstone in Africa, and who asked Dr. Livingston to please not try and convert him as he proclaimed to be ‘the biggest swaggering atheist on the face of the earth’, four month after meeting Dr. Livingstsone, knelt down on that african soil and gave his life to Jesus.

Dr. Livingstone’s Christian faith is evident in his journal, where one entry reads: „I place no value on anything I have or may possess, except in relation to the kingdom of Christ. If anything will advance the interests of the kingdom, it shall be given away or kept, only as by giving or keeping it I shall promote the glory of Him to whom I owe all my hopes in time and eternity.

Below, you will find some materials which are meant to inspire. They  show us the dedication and perseverance of a father of 6, who answered his calling in the 1800’s to be a missionary to Africa- Dr. David Livingstone of Blantyre, Scotland.

A 13 min documentary from the Scotland National Archives

The following are excerpts from Wikipedia:

David Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873), was a Scottish Congregationalist pioneer medical missionary with the London Missionary Society and an explorer in Africa. His meeting with H. M. Stanley gave rise to the popular quotation „Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

David_LivingstoneDavid Livingstone was born on 19 March 1813 in the mill town of Blantyre, in a tenement building for the workers of a cotton factory on the banks of the Clyde River under the bridge crossing into Bothwell, Lanarkshire, Scotland. He was the second of seven children born to Neil Livingstone (1788–1856) and his wife Agnes Hunter (1782–1865). Along with many of the Livingstones, David was at the age of ten employed in the cotton mill of H. Monteith & Co. in the village of Blantyre Works. David and his brother John worked twelve-hour days as „piecers,” tying broken cotton threads on the spinning machines. David Livingstone, the great African missionary and explorer, was a student at the Charing Cross Hospital Medical School. His medical studies extended from 1838 to 1840 and records show that he “paid the fees for the full course of medical practice, midwifery and botany.

Livingstone’s father Neil was very committed to his beliefs, a Sunday School teacher and teetotaller who handed out Christian tracts on his travels as a door to door tea salesman, and who read extensively books on theology, travel and missionary enterprises. This rubbed off on the young David, who became an avid reader, but he also loved scouring the countryside for animal, plant and geological specimens in local limestone quarries. Neil Livingstone had a fear of science books as undermining Christianity and attempted to force him to read nothing but theology, but David’s deep interest in nature and science led him to investigate the relationship between religion and science.[3] When in 1832 he read Philosophy of a Future State by the science teacher, amateur astronomer and church minister Thomas Dick, he found the rationale he needed to reconcile faith and science, and apart from theBible this book was perhaps his greatest philosophical influence.

Livingstone attended Blantyre village school along with the few other mill children with the endurance to do so despite their 12-hour workday (6 am–8 pm), but having a family with a strong, ongoing commitment to study also reinforced his education. After reading Gutzlaff’s appeal for medical missionaries for China in 1834, he began saving money and in 1836 entered Anderson’s College (now University of Strathclyde) in Glasgow, founded to bring science and technology to ordinary folk, and attended Greek and theology lectures at the University of Glasgow. It is now known that to enter Medical School he required some knowledge of Latin. A local Roman Catholic, Daniel Gallagher, helped him learn Latin to the required level.

In addition, he attended divinity lectures by Wardlaw, a leader at this time of vigorous anti-slavery campaigning in the city. Shortly after, he applied to join the London Missionary Society (LMS) and was accepted subject to missionary training. He continued his medical studies in London while training there and was attached to a church in Ongar, Essex, to be a minister under LMS. Despite his impressive personality, he was a plain preacher and would have been rejected by the LMS had not the director given him a second chance to pass the course.

Livingstone hoped to go to China as a missionary, but the First Opium War broke out in September 1839 and the LMS suggested the West Indies instead. In 1840, while continuing his medical studies in London, Livingstone met LMS missionary Robert Moffat, on leave from Kuruman, a missionary outpost in South Africa, north of the Orange River. Excited by Moffat’s vision of expanding missionary work northwards, and influenced by abolitionist T.F. Buxton’s arguments that the African slave trade might be destroyed through the influence of „legitimate trade” and the spread of Christianity, Livingstone focused his ambitions on Southern Africa. He was deeply influenced by Moffat’s judgment that he was the right person to go to the vast plains to the north of Bechuanaland, where he had glimpsed „the smoke of a thousand villages, where no missionary had ever been.”

Livingstone’s exploration-southern and central Africa

After the Kolobeng mission had to be closed because of drought, he explored the African interior to the north, in the period 1852–56, and was the first European to see the Mosi-oa-Tunya („the smoke that thunders”) waterfall (which he renamed Victoria Falls after his monarch, Queen Victoria), of which he wrote later, „Scenes so lovely must have been gazed upon by angels in their flight.” (Jeal, p. 149)

Livingstone was one of the first Westerners to make a transcontinental journey across Africa, Luanda on the Atlantic to Quelimane on the Indian Ocean near the mouth of the Zambezi, in 1854–56. Despite repeated European attempts, especially by the Portuguese, central and southern Africa had not been crossed by Europeans at that latitude owing to their susceptibility to malaria, dysentery and sleeping sickness which was prevalent in the interior and which also prevented use of draught animals (oxen and horses), as well as to the opposition of powerful chiefs and tribes. The qualities and approaches which gave Livingstone an advantage as an explorer were that he usually travelled lightly, and he had an ability to reassure chiefs that he was not a threat.

Livingstone was a proponent of trade and Christian missions to be established in central Africa.

His motto, inscribed in the base of the statue to him at Victoria Falls, was „Christianity, Commerce and Civilization.” At this time he believed the key to achieving these goals was the navigation of the Zambezi River as a Christian commercial highway into the interior. He returned to Britain to try to garner support for his ideas, and to publish a book on his travels which brought him fame as one of the leading explorers of the age.

Believing he had a spiritual calling for exploration rather than mission work, and encouraged by the response in Britain to his discoveries and support for future expeditions, in 1857 he resigned from the London Missionary Society after they demanded that he do more evangelizing and less exploring. With the help of the Royal Geographical Society’s president, Livingstone was appointed as Her Majesty’s Consul for the East Coast of Africa.  Below-right: Dr. Livingstone’s hand drawn map of Lake Malawi (from Scotland’s National Archives)

David-Livingstones-MapIn January 1866, Livingstone returned to Africa, this time to Zanzibar, from where he set out to seek the source of the Nile. Richard Francis Burton, John Hanning Speke and Samuel Baker had (although there was still serious debate on the matter) identified either Lake Albert or Lake Victoria as the source (which was partially correct, as the Nile „bubbles from the ground high in the mountains of Burundi halfway between Lake Tanganyika and Lake Victoria”). Livingstone believed the source was further south and assembled a team of freed slaves, Comoros Islanders, twelve Sepoys and two servants, Chuma and Susi, from his previous expedition to find it.

With his health declining he sent a message to Zanzibar requesting supplies be sent to Ujiji and he then headed west. Forced by ill health to travel with slave traders he arrived at Lake Mweru on 8 November 1867 and continued on, travelling south to become the first European to see Lake Bangweulu. Finding the Lualaba River, Livingstone mistakenly concluded it was the high part of the Nile River; in fact it flows into the River Congo at Upper Congo Lake.

The year 1869 began with Livingstone finding himself extremely ill whilst in the jungle. He was saved by Arab traders who gave him medicines and carried him to an Arab outpost. In March 1869 Livingstone, suffering from pneumonia, arrived in Ujiji to find his supplies stolen. Coming down with cholera and tropical ulcers on his feet he was again forced to rely on slave traders to get him as far as Bambara where he was caught by the wet season. With no supplies, Livingstone had to eat his meals in a roped off open enclosure for the entertainment of the locals in return for food.

On 15 July 1871, according to Livingstone’s recently released original handwritten diaries, while he was visiting the town of Nyangwe on the banks of the Lualaba River, he witnessed around 400 Africans being massacred by slavers. The massacre horrified Livingstone, leaving him too shattered to continue his mission to find the source of the Nile. Following the end of the wet season, he travelled 240 miles from Nyangwe – violently ill most of the way – back to Ujiji, an Arab settlement on the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika, arriving on 23 October 1871.

Geographical discoveries

Although Livingstone was wrong about the Nile, he discovered for Western science numerous geographical features, such as Lake Ngami, Lake Malawi, and Lake Bangweulu in addition to Victoria Falls mentioned above. He filled in details of Lake Tanganyika, Lake Mweru and the course of many rivers, especially the upper Zambezi, and his observations enabled large regions to be mapped which previously had been blank. Even so, the furthest north he reached, the north end of Lake Tanganyika, was still south of the Equator and he did not penetrate the rainforest of the River Congo any further downstream than Ntangwe near Misisi.

Livingstone was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society of London and was made a Fellow of the society, with which he had a strong association for the rest of his life.

Stanley meeting

Henry Morton Stanley meets David Livingstone.  Henry Morton Stanley, who had been sent to find him by the New York Herald newspaper in 1869, found Livingstone in the town of Ujiji on the shores of Lake Tanganyika on 10 November 1871, greeting him with the now famous words „Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” to which he responded „Yes”, and then „I feel thankful that I am here to welcome you.” These famous words may have been a fabrication, as Stanley later tore out the pages of this encounter in his diary. Even Livingstone’s account of this encounter does not mention these words. However, the phrase appears in a New York Herald editorial dated 10 August 1872, and theEncyclopædia Britannica and the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography both quote it without questioning its veracity. The words are famous because of their perceived tongue-in-cheek humorous nature: Dr. Livingstone was the only white person for hundreds of miles. Stanley’s book suggests that it was really because of embarrassment, because he did not dare to embrace him.

Despite Stanley’s urgings, Livingstone was determined not to leave Africa until his mission was complete. His illness made him confused and he had judgment difficulties at the end of his life. He explored the Lualaba and, failing to find connections to the Nile, returned to Lake Bangweulu and its swamps to explore possible rivers flowing out northwards.

Death

David Livingstone died in that area in Chief Chitambo’s village at Ilala southeast of Lake Bangweulu in present-day Zambia on 1 May 1873 from malaria and internal bleeding caused by dysentery. He took his final breaths while kneeling in prayer at his bedside. (His journal indicates that the date of his death would have been 1 May, but his attendants noted the date as 4 May, which they carved on a tree and later reported; this is the date on his grave.) Britain wanted the body to give it a proper ceremony, but the tribe would not give his body to them. Finally they relented, but cut the heart out and put a note on the body that said, „You can have his body, but his heart belongs in Africa!”. Livingstone’s heart was buried under a Mvula tree near the spot where he died, now the site of theLivingstone Memorial. His body together with his journal was carried over a thousand miles by his loyal attendants Chuma and Susi to the coast to Bagamoyo, and was returned to Britain for burial. After lying in repose at No.1 Savile Row—then the headquarters of the Royal Geographical Society, now the home of bespoke tailors Gieves & Hawkes— his remains were interred at Westminster Abbey, London.

Legacy

By the late 1860s Livingstone’s reputation in Europe had suffered owing to the failure of the missions he set up, and of the Zambezi Expedition; and his ideas about the source of the Nile were not supported. His expeditions were hardly models of order and organization. His reputation was rehabilitated by Stanley and his newspaper, and by the loyalty of Livingstone’s servants whose long journey with his body inspired wonder. The publication of his last journal revealed stubborn determination in the face of suffering.

He had made geographical discoveries for European knowledge. He inspired abolitionists of the slave trade, explorers and missionaries. He opened up Central Africa to missionaries who initiated the education and health care for Africans, and trade by the African Lakes Company. He was held in some esteem by many African chiefs and local people and his name facilitated relations between them and the British.

Partly as a result, within fifty years of his death, colonial rule was established in Africa and white settlement was encouraged to extend further into the interior.

On the other hand, within a further fifty years after that, two other aspects of his legacy paradoxically helped end the colonial era in Africa without excessive bloodshed. Livingstone was part of an evangelical and nonconformist movement in Britain which during the 19th century changed the national mindset from the notion of a divine right to rule ‘lesser races’, to ethical ideas in foreign policy which, with other factors, contributed to the end of the British Empire. Secondly, Africans educated in mission schools founded by people inspired by Livingstone were at the forefront of national independence movements in central, eastern and southern Africa.

While Livingstone had a great impact on British Imperialism, he did so at a tremendous cost to his family. In his absences, his children grew up missing their father, and his wife Mary (daughter of Mary and Robert Moffat) endured very poor health, and died of malaria trying to follow him in Africa. He had six children: Robert reportedly died in the American Civil War; Agnes (b.1847), Thomas, Elizabeth (who died two months after her birth), William Oswell (nicknamed Zouga because of the river along which he was born, in 1851) and Anna Mary (b.1858). Only Agnes, William Oswell and Anna Mary married and had children.

His one regret in later life was that he did not spend enough time with his children, whom he loved immensely

His Christian faith is evident in his journal, where one entry reads: „I place no value on anything I have or may possess, except in relation to the kingdom of Christ. If anything will advance the interests of the kingdom, it shall be given away or kept, only as by giving or keeping it I shall promote the glory of Him to whom I owe all my hopes in time and eternity.

The archives of David Livingstone are maintained by the Archives of the University of Glasgow (GUAS). On November, 11, 2011, Dr. Livingstone’s 1871 Field Diary, as well as other original works, was published online for the first time by the „David Livingstone Spectral Imaging Project – a unique, eighteen-month, transatlantic collaboration between scholars, scientists and educational and archival institutions

A good book detailing the lives of both

Henry Morgan Stanley & Dr. David Livingstone

I found the talk as fascinating as Dr. Livingston’s story, as the author recounted his own trek to the roads and places that Dr. Livingstone once walked. It helped create a picture of the dangers that Dr. Livingstone and Stanley lived on a daily basis- some dangers that are obviously still encountered in the present, as Mr. Dugard says- Africa is this still vast deserted expanse in many places.

You can watch the 44 minute C span video of a talk at Vroman’s Bookstore, where Mr.Dugard discussed his book Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone, published by Doubleday. The book tells the story of journalist Henry Morton Stanley’s journey into Africa in the hopes of locating explorer and former Christian missionary Dr. David Livingstone. In 1866, in the midst of an exploratory mission into central Africa, Dr. Livingstone vanished without a clue. After years passed without any indication of Livingstone’s fate, an American newspaper publisher sent Stanley on a mission to locate Dr. Livingstone in the hopes that such a captivating story would increase readership. Mr. Dugard tells the stories of both Livingstone and Stanley and chronicles their respective lives in the years after leaving Africa. After his presentation Mr. Dugard answered questions from members of the audience. Click here to watch C span’s video – http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/176539-1

And here’s a 13 minute clip from the Dr. David Livingstone movie (it is available at Amazon for instant download)

AUDIO BOOK

How I found Dr. David Livingstone

by Henry Morton Stanley

17 audio chapters

Called to Preach – Leonard Ravenhill recounts a story told by A.W. Tozer

A. W. Tozer

color photo of Leonard Ravenhill

Leonrad Ravenhill recounts meeting A.W.Tozer, who was holding a scrap of paper in his hand which to Tozer was more valuable than receiving a letter from the President. The letter was from an african man named Dumas, who was saved in a small baptist church in Africa.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kw56FTvxUMs?rel=0&w=420&h=315]

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