The Ground of All Human Assurance Before God – Don Carson

„Biblical Foundations for Seeking God’s Justice in a Sinful World” (TGC15 Panel)

Watch Thabiti Anyabwile, Tim Keller, John Piper, Don Carson at the 2105 National Conference in Orlando, Florida.

VIDEO by The Gospel Coalition

Don Carson: „The Lord Is There” (Ezekiel 40–48)

Watch Mark Dever speak on Ezekiel 40–48 at our 2015 National Conference in Orlando, Florida.

For more resources visit TGC.org.

VIDEO by The Gospel Coalition

The Gospel Coalition 2015 Panel Discussion: Thabiti Anyabwile, Tim Keller, John Piper, Don Carson

D A Carson [moderator]:

Now, unless you were living cut off from all news sources of the digital world, you have to be aware of the very significant discussion that has taken place, in the wake of, especially Ferguson and New York City, and more recent events as well. It is important that we talk about these things, not least, when we disagree on our perception of some of them. Merely throwing brick bats and yelling at each other is not going to help. And, as Christians, then we want to talk about these things with minds profoundly submitted to Scripture and eager to be reformed by the Word of God, not least when our emotions are so heavily involved.

Watch Thabiti Anyabwile, Tim Keller, John Piper, Don Carson at the 2105 National Conference in Orlando, Florida.

For more resources visit TGC.org.

Thabiti Anyabwile, Tim Keller, John Piper, Don Carson: Panel from The Gospel Coalition on Vimeo.

 

Don Carson preaching at the Chinese Conference in Los Angeles (2 sessions)

The Good Samaritan

The Rich Man and Lazarus

These 2 sermons are from October 26-28, 2012: held in Los Angeles, CA- Chinese Conference sponsored by Kernel of Wheat Ministries. The text is in

Luke 16:19 The Rich Man and Lazarus. Carson: How shall we understand this story? Is Jesus saying that there is always a simple reversal?-

  • live life well, end in hell
  • suffer pain, enjoy great gain
  • if you’re happy here, you’ll be miserable there
  • if you’re miserable here, you’ll be happy there

d a carsona simple reversal? Now, clearly, there is some kind of reversal here. But, so much of Scripture stands against any notion that there’s always reversal. For example, in Scripture, there are at least some Godly rich people. Think of Abraham, Job, Esther, at least in his early days, Solomon, Philemon, probably Theophilus. Moreover, there are at least some poor who are wicked. The Bible is very compassionate against those who are poor through no fault of their own. And, especially compassionate towards those who are poor because they are oppressed. But, the Book of Proverbs can also consider some poor, who are poor because they’re lazy. The sarcasm drips off the page.

Moreover, one has to integrate this passage with the rest of the Gospel of Luke. All four Gospels, including Luke are rushing towards the cross. If our eternal destiny is founded on the simple reversal theme, we don’t need the cross, all we need is poverty. (That is why) it is important to read our passage within the context. (5:02)…

What is the very essence of idolatry?

Obviously, it’s possible to serve two masters, if neither one is asking for absolute control. But, where there are competing interests, only one can win. And, the particular application Jesus makes here is you cannot serve both God and money. Of course He could have made other applications: You cannot serve both God and power, you cannot serve both God and sex. Now, in all three cases- money, power and sex- there is nothing intrinsically wrong with it. Money can be very useful and do a lot of good. Power, rightly exercised can be reforming. And sex, within its God ordained constraints is everywhere pictured as a good gift. But, even a good thing becomes a bad thing, that (eventually) becomes the supreme thing. That is the very essence of idolatry. For idolatry, you don’t necessarily have to follow a bad thing. All you have to do is make a good thing the supreme thing.

That’s why elsewhere Paul says covetousness is idolatry. Because when you covet something, that’s what you want the most, so that becomes God for you. But Jesus tells us that you cannot have 2 masters. If God is God you cannot most want money. What we most want is what we most fantasize about, what we daydream about, what we thing about. So the task becomes very clear: You cannot serve both God and anything else.

Pharisaism

In verses 14-15, we find Jesus addressing the Pharisees directly. The Pharisees, who loved money, heard all this and were sneering at Jesus. When it says that they sneered Him, almost certainly, they were sneering at him because they had money and He didn’t. So, among themselves, they were saying something like this: „Well, Jesus, you’re just some poor, itinerant preacher from Galilee. You don’t have money, so you don’t understand. We could be very Godly with our money,” they would say. „We tithe. We give alms for the poor. We can follow God and be rich. Don’t you see, that’s what we are?” They’re sneering at him. But, Jesus doesn’t back down. He says, in verse 15, „You are the ones who justify yourselves in the eyes of others, but God knows your hearts.

In biblical justification, God justifies the ungodly on the basis of what Christ has done. But, in self justification, we justify ourselves on the basis of what we do. To be quite frank, sometime, when we are formally thanking God for graces that we’ve received, our motivations are so complex that at the same time we are patting ourselves on the back for having them. And, instead of seeing that we should be people that are constantly asking God for His grace, we become people who are quietly self congratulating ourselves. That’s what’s going on in this text.

These Pharisees are justifying themselves in front of others, in the context of talking about money, then they’re saying things like this, „God must like me quite a lot, because he’s blessed me with quite a lot of money.” And so, when they came up to a spotlight in their brand new chariot, and came up to someone who was driving just a broken down donkey, they would not actually say, „I’m better than they are.” But, deep down, when the light changed and they took off in their chariot, they knew that they were better. It’s so easy when you have money to begin to rank yourself, as compared with others, on the basis of how much you’ve got. Now, let me insist again. There are Godly men in scripture with money like Job, for example. So, if you’re a job, you don’t need this comment I’m about to make.

But, if you are not a Job, I warn you that having a lot of money is so easily away of justifying yourself in front of others who have less. You develop a ranking system in the church- not on the basis of Godliness or evangelistic fervor, but, on the basis of money. What does Jesus say about that? Verse 15- „what people value highly is detestable in God’s sight.” Now you see, it’s not the money God detests. He detests the money when people value the money so much as to make the money God. When they start to justify themselves on the basis of their money, then God detests it. Once again, we discover that the context is talking quite a lot about money.

The idolatry of possessions

At the end of chapter 15- The Parable of the Prodigal Son- (in which) a prodigal wastes His father’s possessions. Then at the beginning of chapter 16 – a dishonest servant wastes his master’s possession. Now, in the story of ‘the rich man and Lazarus‘, a rich man wastes his own possessions. In fact, we’re in a part of Luke’s Gospel where there’s a lot of emphasis on the idolatry of possessions. But, in principle, once again I must remind you that you could tell a very similar story  if you made sex your god, or if you made power your god, or if you made beauty your god, or if you made being a hunk your god. But here, the focus is on money. (18:30) There are still 40 minutes left of this message, which you can watch below. Uploaded by
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Gospel Coalition Full Audio Messages by Speaker 2011

Panel Discussion of Rob Bell’s book ‘Love wins’ at Gospel Coalition 2011

Click below for notes of  panel discussion:

R. Albert Mohler, Jr.: “Studying the Scriptures and Finding Jesus” (John 5:31-47)

Tim Keller: “Getting Out” (Exodus 14)

Alistair Begg: “From a Foreigner to King Jesus” (Ruth)

Session 4: Panel Discussion: Preaching from the Old Testament

Panel: Tim Keller, John Piper, Crawford Loritts, Don Carson, Bryan Chapell

James MacDonald: “Not According to Our Sins” (Psalm 25)

Conrad Mbewe: “The Righteous Branch” (Jeremiah 23:1-8)

Matt Chandler: “Youth” (Ecclesiastes 11:7-12:14)

Mike Bullmore: „God’s Great Heart of Love Toward His Own” (Zephaniah)

Don Carson: „Getting Excited about Melchizedek” (Psalm 110)

to see more of these great pictures, taken by Christian Photographer

Billy Jackson – click on image above (of Dr. Carson & Dr Piper)

Next Conference Event

April 29-30, 2011

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Gospel Coalition – Full Video and Audio Messages by Speaker 2011

***(New) Click here for The Gospel Coalition 2011 Video Page (for all messages)

Panel Discussion of Rob Bell’s book ‘Love wins’ at Gospel Coalition 2011

Click below for notes of  panel discussion:

R. Albert Mohler, Jr.: “Studying the Scriptures and Finding Jesus” (John 5:31-47)

Tim Keller: “Getting Out” (Exodus 14)

Alistair Begg: “From a Foreigner to King Jesus” (Ruth)

Session 4: Panel Discussion: Preaching from the Old Testament

Panel: Tim Keller, John Piper, Crawford Loritts, Don Carson, Bryan Chapell

James MacDonald: “Not According to Our Sins” (Psalm 25)

Conrad Mbewe: “The Righteous Branch” (Jeremiah 23:1-8)

Matt Chandler: “Youth” (Ecclesiastes 11:7-12:14)

Mike Bullmore: „God’s Great Heart of Love Toward His Own” (Zephaniah)

Don Carson: „Getting Excited about Melchizedek” (Psalm 110)

to see more of these great pictures, taken by Christian Photographer

Billy Jackson – click on image above (of Dr. Carson & Dr Piper)

Next Conference Event

April 29-30, 2011

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The Gospel Coalition April 12-14 in Chicago (link to watch it live courtesy of Desiring God org.)

Update – April 15 Full Audio links- page here.

From Justin Taylor at The Gospel Coalition website:

Link to watch it live http://ow.ly/4xW2x

Watch TGC11 Live from Chicago All times below are Central (UTC-5).

Tuesday, April 12

2 PM R. Albert Mohler Jr. Studying the Scriptures and Finding Jesus (John 5:31-47)
4 PM Tim Keller Getting Out (Exodus 14)
5:30 PM White Horse Inn Live Recording: The Great Commission and the Great Commandment
7 PM Alistair Begg From a Foreigner to King Jesus (Ruth)
8 PM Tim Keller, John Piper, Crawford Loritts, Don Carson, Bryan Chapell Preaching from the Old Testament
9 PM Hymn Sing Sing Them Again: An Evening of Old and New Hymns

Wednesday, April 13

9:30 AM James MacDonald Not According to Our Sins (Psalm 25)
12:30 PM Matt Chandler, Kevin DeYoung, Trevin Wax, Jonathan Leeman Gospel, Mission, and the Church
7 PM Conrad Mbewe The Righteous Branch (Jeremiah 23:1-8)
8 PM Matt Chandler Youth (Ecclesiastes 11:7-12:14)
9 PM Keith and Kristyn Getty Concert

Thursday, April 14

7:30 AM Don Carson, Tim Keller, Crawford Loritts, Kevin DeYoung, and Stephen Um God: Abounding in Love, Punishing the Guilty
9:30 AM Mike Bullmore God’s Great Heart of Love Toward His Own (Zephaniah)
11 AM D. A. Carson Getting Excited about Melchizedek (Psalm 110)

So you weren’t able to join us this year in Chicago for The Gospel Coalition’s 2011 national conference. We have good news! Follow along with us and learn how to teach Jesus and the gospel from the Old Testament by watching the livestream from TGC’s conference media page. You’ll be able to watch all nine plenary sessions, beginning with R. Albert Mohler Jr. on Tuesday afternoon, April 12, at 2 p.m. CDT. The final address will be given by Don Carson, who begins on Thursday morning, April 14, at 11 a.m. CDT. Check the schedule for the times of every address. We will also make audio of each talk available for download afterward on the media page.

–>Neither Do I Condemn You by John Piper (The message he gives every 10 years) Essential sermon from John 7:53-8:11

from DesiringGod.org March 6,2011

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Neither Do I Condemn You

John 7:53-8:11

[[They went each to his own house, but Jesus went to the Mount of Olives. Early in the morning he came again to the temple. All the people came to him, and he sat down and taught them. The scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman who had been caught in adultery, and placing her in the midst they said to him, “Teacher, this woman has been caught in the act of adultery.Now in the Law Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say?” This they said to test him, that they might have some charge to bring against him. Jesus bent down and wrote with his finger on the ground. And as they continued to ask him, he stood up and said to them, “Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” And once more he bent down and wrote on the ground. But when they heard it, they went away one by one, beginning with the older ones, and Jesus was left alone with the woman standing before him. Jesus stood up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” She said, “No one, Lord.” And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more.”]]

This message is the kind I may give once every decade or so. The reason it’s so rare is that the situation with our text is so rare. In most of your Bibles, you notice that John 7:53 to John 8:11 is either set off in brackets or is in a footnote. The reason for this is that most New Testament scholars do not think it was part of the Gospel of John when it was first written, but was added centuries later.

For example…

  • Don Carson, who teaches at Trinity, and is in my view one of the best New Testament scholars in the world, writes, „Despite the best efforts . . . to prove that this narrative was originally part of John’s Gospel, the evidence is against [them], and modern English versions are right to rule it off from the rest of the text (NIV) or to relegate it to a footnote (RSV).” (The Gospel According to John, 1991, p. 333)
  • Bruce Metzger, one of the world’s great authorities on the text of the New Testament until his death in 2002: „The evidence for the non-Johannine origin of the periscope of the adulteress is overwhelming.” (The Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament, 1971, p. 219)
  • Leon Morris: „The textual evidence makes it impossible to hold that this section is an authentic part of the Gospel.” (The Gospel According to John, 1971, p. 882)
  • Andreas Köstenberger: „This represents overwhelming evidence that the section is non-Johannine.” (John, 2004, p. 246)
  • And Herman Ridderbos: The evidences „point to an unstable tradition that was not originally part of an ecclesiastically accepted text.” (The Gospel of John, 1997, p. 286)

I think they are right. And this gives us a chance to spend a little while on the branch of Biblical Studies behind these judgments called Textual Criticism, and its implications for the trustworthiness and authority of the Scriptures. So let me summarize the reasons these scholars give for thinking this the story of the woman taken in adultery was not originally part of John’s Gospel, and then give some general thoughts about the science of Textual Criticism that helps make sense of the arguments.

Reasons This Section Isn’t Original to John’s Gospel

The evidence goes something like this:

  1. The story is missing from all the Greek manuscripts of John before the fifth century.
  2. All the earliest church fathers omit this passage in commenting on John and pass directly from John 7:52 to John 8:12.
  3. In fact, the text flows very nicely from 7:52 to 8:12 if you leave out the story and just read the passage as though the story were not there.
  4. No Eastern church father cites the passage before the tenth century when dealing with this Gospel.
  5. When the story starts to appear in manuscript copies of the Gospel of John, it shows up in three different places other than here (after 7:36; 7:44; and 21:25), and in one manuscript of Luke, it shows up after 21:38.
  6. Its style and vocabulary is more unlike the rest of John’s Gospel than any other paragraph in the Gospel.

Now saying all that assumes a lot of facts that many of you simply don’t have at your fingertips. And nobody expects you to. This is a hugely technical field of scholarship that at the upper levels requires not only the ability to read ancient languages, but the ability to read them in kinds of ancient handwritten scripts that are very demanding. So let me give you just enough so that you can make sense of these reasons.

The Science of Textual Criticism

The New Testament that we know was originally written in Greek. The first printed Greek New Testament—that came off a printing press—was published by Erasmus in 1516. It turned the world upside down. If you want a great glimpse of this period and the heroism it produced, read David Daniell’s biography of William Tyndale.

This means that for 1500 years the manuscripts of the biblical books were passed down to us through handwritten copies. This is how we have access to the actual words that the New Testament writers wrote with their very hands. None of those first, original manuscripts is known to exist. Which is probably just as well, since we would probably turn it into an idol and charge money for people come worship.

So the books of the New Testament were preserved for us by faithful, hardworking copyists. Some of these copies were in a script called uncials (referring to manuscripts with all capital Greek letters), others were in a script called minuscule (referring to manuscripts with small Greek letters). A smaller number are called papyri because they are very early and written on the special paper-like material made from the Papyrus plant that was prevalent in the Nile Delta. One last group of manuscripts is the lectionaries—which were collections of texts for reading in public worship.

What’s Simply Staggering

Now here is what’s amazing. The abundance of these manuscripts of the New Testament, or parts of the New Testament, as compared to the number of manuscripts for all other ancient works is simply staggering.

  • There are 10 existing manuscripts of Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars (composed between 58 and 50 B.C.). And all of these date from the tenth century or later.
  • There are 20 manuscripts of Livy’s Roman History written roughly during the time when Jesus was alive.
  • Only two manuscripts exist for Tacitus’s Histories and the Annals which were composed around A.D. 100—one from the ninth and one from the eleventh century.
  • There are only eight manuscripts of the History of Thucydides who lived 460-400 B.C.

Compare those numbers with the manuscripts and partial manuscripts for the New Testament. These numbers are from the Institute for New Testament Textual Research in Muenster, Germany, which is the most authoritative collection of such data in the world. There are 322 uncial texts, 2,907 minuscule texts, 2,445 lectionary portions, and 127 papyri, for a total of 5,801 manuscripts. These are all hand-written copies of the New Testament or parts of the New Testament preserved in libraries around the world and now captured electronically. No other ancient book comes close to this kind of wealth of diverse preservation.

Problems and Solutions

What that wealth does is create problems and solutions at the same time. These copies do not all agree on what the wording was in the original manuscripts. So the more manuscripts you have, the more variations you find. On the other hand, the more manuscripts you have, the more control you have over which readings are the original ones. The more manuscripts you have the more variations you find, and yet the more they tend to be self-correcting.

For example, if you had only two ancient manuscripts of the Gospel of John and one has the story of the woman taken in adultery and the other doesn’t, you would be hard put to choose. But if you have a hundred manuscripts of John, even though you may find more variations, you will be able to tell by the number and age and geographical diversity of the manuscripts whether the story was there or not. This is what the science of Textual Criticism has done with hundreds of variations in the manuscripts.

Here’s the way F. F. Bruce put it a generation ago: „If the great number of manuscripts increases the number of scribal errors, it increases proportionately the means of correcting such errors, so that the margin of doubt left in the process of recovering the exact original wording is . . . in truth remarkably small” (The New Testament Documents, p. 19).

No Doctrine Threatened

But what is most significant for the reliability and authority of the New Testament is that the variations that Textual Critics are unsure of are not the kind that would change any Christian doctrine. For example, in our passage from John 7:53–8:11, no truth that this Gospel teaches is changed by omitting this story. Bruce says, „The variant readings about which any doubt remains among textual critics of the New Testament affects no material question of historic fact or of Christian faith and practice” (The New Testament Documents, p. 20).

Nothing on this score has changed in the last generation since F. F. Bruce wrote in 1943, except, perhaps, that people like Bart Ehrman of the University of North Carolina, have become very popular in questioning the reliability of our New Testament to give us what the original authors wrote.

Reason to Worship God

In 2006, Paul D. Wegner reaffirmed F. F. Bruce’s assessment (A Student’s Guide To Textual Criticism of the Bible, Downers Grove: InterVarsity): „It is important to keep in perspective the fact that only a very small part of the text is in question. . . . Of these, most variants make little difference to the meaning of any passage.”

Then he closes his book by quoting Fredric Kenyon: „It is reassuring at the end to find that the general result of all these discoveries and all this study is to strengthen the proof of the authenticity of the Scriptures, and our conviction that we have in our hands, in substantial integrity, the veritable Word of God” (Frederic G. Kenyon, The Story of the Bible, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1967), p. 113, quoted in Wegner, p. 301).

So when I agree with the vast majority of scholars that the story of the woman taken in adultery was not in the Gospel of John, you should not think: „O my everything is up for grabs now.” Or: „How can I count on any text?” On the contrary, you can be thankful that God has, in his sovereign providence over the transmission process for 2,000 years, ordered things so that the few uncertainties that remain alter no doctrine of the Christian faith. That is really astonishing when you think about it, and we should worship God because of it.

What’s a Preacher to Do?

Now the question is: What should I, the preacher, do with this story? Both Don Carson and Bruce Metzger think the story probably happened. In other words, they think this is a real event from Jesus’s life, and the story circulated and later was put in the Gospel of John. Metzger says, „The account has all the earmarks of historical veracity” (Textual Commentary, p. 220). And Carson says, „There is little reason for doubting that the event here described occurred” (The Gospel According to John, p. 333).

Perhaps. I would like to think so. Who doesn’t love this story? But that does not give it the authority of Scripture. So what I will do is take its most remarkable point and show that it is true on the basis of other parts of Scripture, and so let this story not be the basis of our authority, but an echo and a pointer to our authority, namely, the Scriptures, that teach what it says.

The Most Remarkable Point

The most remarkable point of this story is that Jesus exalts himself above the Law of Moses, changes its appointed punishment, and reestablishes righteousness on the foundation of grace. I don’t doubt that this is why the story was preserved. It is an amazing story. Let me show you where I get that lesson and why I think it is a faithful echo of the rest of the New Testament.

The woman is caught in adultery and brought to Jesus. In verses 4–5, the scribes and Pharisees put Jesus to the test. We have seen this before in the Gospels. This has the ring of truth. Here’s what they say, „Teacher, this woman has been caught in the act of adultery. Now in the Law Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say?” So this is a blatant test to see if Jesus will contradict the Law.

Pharisees Taking Aiming at Jesus

The law said, „If a man is found lying with the wife of another man, both of them shall die” (Deuteronomy 22:22; see Leviticus 20:10). There is already something fishy going on here that only the woman is brought forward. There is no such thing as adultery where only one party is guilty. But there she is and no man. So how committed are these scribes and Pharisees really to the law? Or is the law a pretext for their prejudice against Jesus?

Verse 6 makes explicit what their motives were, and so we don’t expect a great deal of justice: „This they said to test him, that they might have some charge to bring against him.” They were using her, and using the law, to get rid of this troublemaker.

The Law Fulfilled in Love

In verse 7, Jesus says, „Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” Now of course, that won’t work as a basis for social justice. No criminals would be brought to justice if judges had to be sinless. That’s why I said Jesus is going to reestablish righteousness. He’s going to do it on the foundation of grace. For now there is zero grace, zero humility, zero compassion. Which means there is zero law-keeping.

Throughout the Gospels, we see Jesus standing against the Pharisees’ view of the law and saying in effect, „Go and learn what this means, ‘I desire mercy, and not sacrifice'” (Matthew 9:13; 12:2). Or: „If on the Sabbath a man receives circumcision, so that the law of Moses may not be broken, are you angry with me because on the Sabbath I made a man’s whole body well?” (John 7:23). In other words, „the Law is fulfilled in one word: Love your neighbor as you love yourself” (Galatians 5:14; cf. Matthew 7:12).

Jesus Reestablishing Righteousness

So Jesus forced them to expose their own misuse of the law. They all walked away. The point is not that judges and executioners must be sinless. The point is that righteousness and justice should be founded on a gracious spirit, and if it’s not, what you get is the heartlessness and hypocrisy of Pharisaism. That’s the point throughout the Gospels, not just here.

When they are all gone, Jesus ends the story saying to the woman, „Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more” (recall John 5:14). Not: Neither do I condemn you, so it doesn’t matter if you commit adultery. But: I am reestablishing righteousness in your life—and the for Pharisees, if they will have it—on the basis of an experience of grace. Don’t commit adultery any more. Not mainly because you fear stoning. But because you have met God, and have been rescued by his grace—saved by grace!

Come for Grace—And Sin No More

The story may not belong to John’s Gospel. In fact, the story may never have happened. But this point of the story is unshakably true. This is the pervasive message of the New Testament. Jesus exalted himself above the Law. He wrote it! Jesus altered some of its sanctions. He pointed to its main goal of Christ-exalting love. And he reestablished righteousness on the basis of an experience of grace.

The story points us to the message of the whole New Testament: We are called to be holy as God is holy. God hates sin. But pursuing holiness without a profound experience of grace in our own lives produces hypocrisy and doctrinaire cruelty. Jesus came into the world to provide that grace through his cross, and to establish holiness, righteousness, and justice on the foundation of our experience of his grace. So come to him for grace, and set your face to sin no more.

© Desiring God. Website: desiringGod.org

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